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Euromemorandum 2016 critically reviews economic policy in the EU in 2015. It argues that the current slight easing of fiscal pressure should be replaced by co-ordinated fiscal expansion. It also discusses the EU democratic deficit with special reference to Greece, as well as migration, youth unemployment and TTIP.

To understand how sexism works, to ask why sexism remains stubbornly persistent in shaping worlds, determining possibilities, deciding futures, despite decades of feminist activism, is to work out and to work through the very mechanics of power. [...]

This article, based on a lecture of the same title prepared for the Sexism Workshop at Goldsmiths College in 2014, builds on personal experience to address the persistence of sexism in the academy. The individual experiences on which it is based are both personal and generic, and the aim of revisiting them here is diagnostic: to examine sexism as a means of reproduction.

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Zara Dinnen, John Ó Maoilearca, Sam McBean

Autumn 2015

Reviews by Zara Dinnen, Geoff Eley, John Ó Maoilearca and Sam McBean

Ada Salter

This rich history tells the life story of Ada Salter, who, in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, had pioneering roles in local politics as well as in feminist and ethical socialist movements. Graham Taylor here shifts the focus, usually on Ada's husband Alfred, to Ada's remarkable work, and her significant impact on Bermondsey and on national politics.

Noisiness in political debate can be a virtue and a vice. Jeremy Corbyn’s incredible victory in the Labour leadership contest is testament to this: from one point of view he has shown the sheer mobilising power of a clear, polemical ideological vision, even when articulated in an unassuming, modest style. [...]

The movement for workers’ control in the 1970s was among the most promising of the many roads not taken in the forgotten history of the left.

Anyone serious about fostering freedom, equality and social justice should support co-operatives.

Soundings has been arguing for a long time that Labour should ‘take a leap’, that it should challenge the dominant terms of debate: that, rather than accepting the established political terrain, it should be marking out distinctive territory of its own. [...]

Article

Jo Littler, Mandy Merck, Hilary Wainwright, Nira Yuval-Davis, Deborah Grayson

Winter 2015

A roundtable discussion on socialism and feminism with Mandy Merck, Hilary Wainwright, Nira Yuval-Davis and Deborah Grayson, chaired by Jo Littler.

First published in Michel Butel’s popular review L’Autre journal, of which he was an editorial board member, Gilles Deleuze’s essay on control societies, re-published in Pourparlers in 1990 and later translated as the ‘Postscript on Control Societies’ (hereafter just the ‘Postscript’) has proved to be one of his most widely cited pieces of work.

One of the UK’s leading radical economists discusses the history of post-Fordism as both a concept and a set of economic practices, with specific reference to his role as an innovative municipal policy-maker at the GLC in the 1980s and subsequently.

Review Essay - Undoing the Demos: Neo-Liberalism’s Stealth Revolution, Wendy Brown, ZONE BOOKS, 2015

Kim Croswell’s, Portrait of Herbert Read (‘To Hell With Freee’), marks the first issue of Anarchist Studies devoted to a pivotal figure in the history of modern art (and much more), with a special focus on Read’s polemical pamphlet, To Hell with Culture (1941).

In 1941 Herbert Read – a British art critic, poet, novelist and political thinker – wrote an essay, to be published as a pamphlet in ‘The Democratic Order’ series, entitled ‘To Hell with Culture’. The essay sought to criticise the capitalist co-optation of culture, whilst simultaneously calling for a functional art within a democratic society.

The Acceptable Face of Feminism

In this book Maggie Andrews explores the WI’s relationship with feminism from the formation of the organisation in 1915 up to the eve of British feminism’s renaissance in the late 1960s.

The term ‘cultural turn’ is generally associated with a shift in leftist, socialist and communist politics after 1956. The upheavals of that year – primarily Soviet intervention in Hungary and Nikita Khrushchev’s revelation of the atrocities committed by Stalin – triggered realignments on the left, both within and without of the communist movement.

1956 proved to be not only a landmark for the international communist movement but a turning point in the Cold War. By the autumn of that year, the bi-polar world order that had been steadily forming since the second world war, had consolidated into diametrically opposed camps whose conflicting interests would dictate the course of history for the next three decades.

Close analysis of the nominations for Labour’s leader and deputy reveals a parliamentary party fracturing along sharper ideological lines than were evident in 2010.

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