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Article

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, James Stafford

Winter 2019

Regardless of the outcome of the election on 12 December, there can be no turning back the clock on Labour’s transformation into a party of thoroughgoing economic radicalism.

Labour’s economic agenda combines radical redistribution with the construction of new institutions that hard-wire democracy and social justice into Britain’s political economy. But its ambition remains largely national in scope. What policies could bring about an ‘international institutional turn’?

In a world where progressive and conservative governments alike are clamping down on migrants, Labour must prioritise a radical commitment to justice for migrants.

Deliberative democracy has the power to counteract division and lack of trust in politics, deliver more radical solutions to problems, and involve communities in tackling those problems. We talked to Georgia Gould, leader of Camden Council, about the transformative potential of deliberative democracy at a local level.

Bernie Sanders and the UK Labour Party have both committed to a radical new policy on worker share ownership: Inclusive Ownership Funds. By giving workers new rights over the wealth they create and the firms that they work for, IOFs can set us on the path to the democratic economy we need.

Advocates of Corbynomics will need to decide on the place of decentralisation and democratisation within their overall vision of economic transformation.

The fall of Theresa May has ushered in a new phase in the UK’s never-ending Brexit crisis. Energy is once again behind a hard-Brexit right led by Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson.

Article

Elizabeth Anderson, Daniel Chandler

Autumn 2019

Elizabeth Anderson interviewed by Daniel Chandler.

Neoliberal globalisation is in crisis – but it’s an illusion to believe that we can turn back the clock on forty years of international economic integration. The left urgently needs to discover the ideas and agency necessary to resist the disaster capitalists of the right, and build a progressive reglobalisation.

The idea of the Foundational Economy has the potential to radically disrupt dysfunctional old assumptions about economic development strategy.

We need a paradigm shift in economic thinking, rejecting the idea of a unified national economy and thinking in terms of different economic zones.

In the context of austerity and increasing in-work poverty, it is increasingly important for anchor institutions to contribute to building stronger economies and communities.

The British left needs to start taking Ulster Unionism seriously, listening and engaging with its concerns, history, and political character.

We need to understand the forms antisemitism takes, and the ways in which it exceeds, as well as intersects with, debates about Palestine and Israel.

Article

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, James Stafford

Spring 2019

Conservative dishonesty over Brexit has put Labour in a dangerous position. By holding back from formulating a coherent and realistic Brexit policy, the party has left itself with many hostages to fortune.

Brings together three perspectives on the central arguments of Adam Tooze’s Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World (2018), and how they differ from other dominant analyses of our current moment

Revisiting socialist debates on the Treaties of Rome (1957) opens a window onto early conceptions of the potential of a European common market and Labour's capitulation to the sovereigntist dogmas of late-imperial Britain.

Attempts to increase financial access for the poor have tended to create bifurcated banking systems, which systematically disadvantage those they are designed to include, and can exacerbate inequality.

A citizen's wealth fund built up via progressive taxation on wealth and the one-off issue of a long-term government bond has huge progressive potential.

If the Labour Party wants to transform Britain’s political economy, we need detailed strategic analyses of what needs to be done and who may stand in our way. We need a movement that does not default to tribalism or purism, but is capable of debating the merits of strategic compromise.

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