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If the Labour Party wants to transform Britain’s political economy, we need detailed strategic analyses of what needs to be done and who may stand in our way. We need a movement that does not default to tribalism or purism, but is capable of debating the merits of strategic compromise.

Brexit has placed the Irish border at the centre of European politics. Westminster urgently needs to wake up to its histories and complexities.

Article

Michael Jacobs, Carys Roberts, Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, James Stafford

Winter 2018

The IPPR’s Commission on Economic Justice published its final report, Prosperity and Justice, on 5 September 2018. Based on two years of research, and led by a group of twenty-two Commissioners from across business, trade unions, activism, churches and academia, the report is a uniquely authoritative statement of an emerging new paradigm in British economic policy. The report sets out an analysis of the deep-seated problems with the UK’s economy, and offers a transformative plan to ‘hard-wire’ justice and sustainability into Britain’s economic model.

The left in British electoral politics has become more fragmented, particularly in the past decade; those with economically left values are increasingly divided by cultural attitudes. It will be vital for Labour to find ways to bridge this growing divide if the party is to be electorally successful.

Labour’s new economic consensus is based on taking power away from capital and returning it to our communities.

Anthony Painter considers whether the left's ‘institutional turn’ will extend freedom and empower individuals and communities, or tend towards bureaucracy and paternalism.

Jon Burke and Mika Minio-Paluello discuss climate transition, local government, and the potential for a geographical and ecological rebalancing of Britain’s economy.

Three recent books engage with the challenges of building institutions that can deliver real social security and empower people as workers and citizens.

In political campaigns in the UK, US, Canada and elsewhere we are seeing the importance of big politics – ideas radical enough to tackle the vast challenges we face – and big organising – building social movements and empowering volunteers to drive campaigns at scale.

Renewal meets Professor Mary Kaldor to discuss her support for left campaigns against Brexit, and to ask what remains of projects for a left-liberal globalism in our current age of revived national power-politics.

Joe Guinan and Martin O’Neill discuss Labour's new twenty-first century socialist political economy.

Thomas M. Hanna argues for democratised and decentralised forms of public ownership.

A review of Rachel Reeves, The Everyday Economy, 2018.

Monique Charles and Natalie Thomlinson respond to Charlotte Proudman's critique of the Labour leadership’s engagement with the feminist tradition.

Article

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, James Stafford

Spring 2018

With the left in a strengthened position and the Labour party enjoying something of an internal truce, this issue takes the opportunity to investigate the normative foundations for a twenty-first century social democracy.

The automation revolution demands an active state: one that promotes investment in new technologies while securing good jobs for all workers.

Nick Srnicek in conversation with Lise Butler

What is the story of the economy in Britain? Who gets to shape public opinion about what it’s for, how it’s broken and how it can be fixed? And how can progressive forces tell a new story to help accelerate the shift to a new economic system?

There is a growing recognition that decentralisation and localism should play a key role in a future Labour manifesto. Where should Labour look for lessons about effective localism? The party’s own past provides valuable lessons about how to forge a progressive localism.

Peter Lee offers an example of Labour politics rooted in a local community and founded on finding practical solutions to local problems. To follow his example today, Labour needs to work to localise power, build an industrial strategy based on the needs of the everyday economy and democratise the way our economy works.

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