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Advocates of Corbynomics will need to decide on the place of decentralisation and democratisation within their overall vision of economic transformation.

The fall of Theresa May has ushered in a new phase in the UK’s never-ending Brexit crisis. Energy is once again behind a hard-Brexit right led by Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson.

Article

Elizabeth Anderson, Daniel Chandler

Autumn 2019

Elizabeth Anderson interviewed by Daniel Chandler.

Neoliberal globalisation is in crisis – but it’s an illusion to believe that we can turn back the clock on forty years of international economic integration. The left urgently needs to discover the ideas and agency necessary to resist the disaster capitalists of the right, and build a progressive reglobalisation.

The idea of the Foundational Economy has the potential to radically disrupt dysfunctional old assumptions about economic development strategy.

We need a paradigm shift in economic thinking, rejecting the idea of a unified national economy and thinking in terms of different economic zones.

In the context of austerity and increasing in-work poverty, it is increasingly important for anchor institutions to contribute to building stronger economies and communities.

The British left needs to start taking Ulster Unionism seriously, listening and engaging with its concerns, history, and political character.

We need to understand the forms antisemitism takes, and the ways in which it exceeds, as well as intersects with, debates about Palestine and Israel.

Article

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, James Stafford

Spring 2019

Conservative dishonesty over Brexit has put Labour in a dangerous position. By holding back from formulating a coherent and realistic Brexit policy, the party has left itself with many hostages to fortune.

Brings together three perspectives on the central arguments of Adam Tooze’s Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World (2018), and how they differ from other dominant analyses of our current moment

Revisiting socialist debates on the Treaties of Rome (1957) opens a window onto early conceptions of the potential of a European common market and Labour's capitulation to the sovereigntist dogmas of late-imperial Britain.

Attempts to increase financial access for the poor have tended to create bifurcated banking systems, which systematically disadvantage those they are designed to include, and can exacerbate inequality.

A citizen's wealth fund built up via progressive taxation on wealth and the one-off issue of a long-term government bond has huge progressive potential.

If the Labour Party wants to transform Britain’s political economy, we need detailed strategic analyses of what needs to be done and who may stand in our way. We need a movement that does not default to tribalism or purism, but is capable of debating the merits of strategic compromise.

Brexit has placed the Irish border at the centre of European politics. Westminster urgently needs to wake up to its histories and complexities.

Article

Michael Jacobs, Carys Roberts, Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, James Stafford

Winter 2018

The IPPR’s Commission on Economic Justice published its final report, Prosperity and Justice, on 5 September 2018. Based on two years of research, and led by a group of twenty-two Commissioners from across business, trade unions, activism, churches and academia, the report is a uniquely authoritative statement of an emerging new paradigm in British economic policy. The report sets out an analysis of the deep-seated problems with the UK’s economy, and offers a transformative plan to ‘hard-wire’ justice and sustainability into Britain’s economic model.

The left in British electoral politics has become more fragmented, particularly in the past decade; those with economically left values are increasingly divided by cultural attitudes. It will be vital for Labour to find ways to bridge this growing divide if the party is to be electorally successful.

Labour’s new economic consensus is based on taking power away from capital and returning it to our communities.

Anthony Painter considers whether the left's ‘institutional turn’ will extend freedom and empower individuals and communities, or tend towards bureaucracy and paternalism.

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