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A discussion of the recent gilets jaunes revolt in France, reflecting on the dynamics of contemporary populist social movements.

Imagine being in the midst of a political mass rally, the first in many years, right in the centre of your home country’s capital. Imagine people from all walks of life with their banners, slogans and demands, asking for a little bit more life and dignity not only for themselves but for the whole of society.

Article

Antje Scharenberg, Nick Beech, Simon Peplow

Summer 2019

Antje Scharenberg reviews Lorenzo Marsili and Niccolò Milanese, Citizens of Nowhere - How Europe Can Be Saved from Itself, Zed 2018 Johny Pitts, Afropean - Notes from Black Europe, Allen Lane 2019 Nick Beech reviews Stuart Hall and Paddy Whannel, The Popular Arts, with an introduction by Richard Dyer, Duke University Press, Durham NC and London 2018 Simon Peplow reviews Shirin Hirsch, In the Shadow of Enoch Powell: Race, Locality and Resistance, Manchester University Press

Article

Antje Scharenberg, Nick Beech, Simon Peplow, John Clarke

Summer 2019

Antje Scharenberg reviews Lorenzo Marsili and Niccolò Milanese, Citizens of Nowhere - How Europe Can Be Saved from Itself, Zed 2018 and Johny Pitts, Afropean - Notes from Black Europe, Allen Lane 2019 Nick Beech reviews Stuart Hall and Paddy Whannel, The Popular Arts, with an introduction by Richard Dyer, Duke University Press, Durham NC and London 2018 Simon Peplow reviews Shirin Hirsch, In the Shadow of Enoch Powell: Race, Locality and Resistance, Manchester University Press John Clarke reviews Kristóf Szombati, The Revolt of the Provinces: Anti-Gypsyism and Right-Wing Politics in Hungary, Berghahn Books, 2018

Alison Winch, Kirsten Forkert and Sally Davison introduce this special issue of Soundings.

Economic decisions - such as where investment is increased and or withdrawn, which services will flourish and which will be run down, whose living standards will be protected or boosted and whose reduced - are not gender neutral. Neoliberal policies in particular have disproportionately affected women, particularly low-income and BAME women, through their lack of interest in social investment and the cuts they are making to the resources and public services that sustain life.

This article explores neoliberal feminism in relation to Africa, with a particular focus on Nigeria.

'It would be so lovely to think that, if I were a man, I could explain the law and people would listen and say "OK." That would be so restful.' Laura, Certain Women (Kelly Reichardt, 2016)

Article

Tamsyn Dent, Jannat Hossain, Katharine Harris, Peter Ridley

Spring 2019

Tamsyn Dent, Jannat Hossain, Katharine Harris, Peter Ridley

1960s counterculture offered a fleeting glimpse of an alternative form of civil society, and the spirit of ’68 continues to inspire the quest for a more open, participatory and democratic society. Some see it as having prepared the way for neoliberal consumerism and individualism, others regard it as the great disseminator of popular and anti-authoritarian politics.

Article

Richard Kuper, Brendan McGeever, Lynne Segal, Nira Yuval-Davis, Jamie Hakim, Ben Little

Autumn 2018

Arguments about antisemitism need to be understood in the context of the current political conjuncture - a time of increased racism in the wider society, but also a time when the issue has been weaponised in order to attack Corbynism. There is a need to acknowledge the existence of antisemitism in the left and Labour Party, even while calling for recognition that it also exists in other parties.

Dominant global narratives on sustainability have a tendency to reinforce precisely the conditions that have produced the crisis. This is because an appropriate response would undermine the whole system. Unsustainable behaviour is framed in terms of ‘them’ (the unsustainable and badly behaved global South) and ‘us’ (the wealthy countries who are ‘helping’ them becoming sustainable - defined in terms of the adoption of western norms).

We are all dependent, none more so than the rich and powerful, who could not maintain their status without an army of servants, in spite of their contempt of the ‘dependency culture’ of the poor. Chronic illness is a common source of dependency. It forces people to rely on the state - and, if they are lucky, a network of good- hearted friends.

We live in a society which has become fearful of the future and of change, and instead seeks sanctuary in imagined and contested versions of the past. A highly successful Churchill industry taps into this mood, marketing and repackaging the man and his image.

London’s LGBTQ+ s communities are rapidly losing their nightlife premises. There was a stark drop of 58 per cent between 2006 and 2017, partly because of property development and processes of gentrification.

The strong commitment of Americans to public education has been under assault since the resurgence of laissez-faire economics in the 1980s and the decline of government commitment to racial integration. The right’s education reform movement has run an ongoing campaign to convince Americans that public schools are failing and win support for policies that transfer public resources to privately run schools.

Two poems by jennifer Lee Tsai

Article

David Featherstone, Daryl Leeworthy

Autumn 2018

David Featherstone reviews Stefan Collini, Speaking of Universities, Verso 2017. Daryl Leeworthy reviews Hywel Francis, Stories of Solidarity, Y Lolfa 2018.

Further, adult and vocational education has always been marginalised, reflecting the divide between academic and vocational education, and the low esteem attached to the latter. This meant that in the 1990s it was possible to carry out neoliberal policies in the further education sector that would have been politically inconceivable in schools.

We are still failing to protect our mental health services and the people who deliver them. One central reason for current problems is the overwhelming focus of the service on Increased Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT), the NHS’s largest mental health programme.

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