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First published in Michel Butel’s popular review L’Autre journal, of which he was an editorial board member, Gilles Deleuze’s essay on control societies, re-published in Pourparlers in 1990 and later translated as the ‘Postscript on Control Societies’ (hereafter just the ‘Postscript’) has proved to be one of his most widely cited pieces of work.

Article

Robin Murray, Jeremy Gilbert, Andrew Goffey

Winter 2014 / Summer 2015

One of the UK’s leading radical economists discusses the history of post-Fordism as both a concept and a set of economic practices, with specific reference to his role as an innovative municipal policy-maker at the GLC in the 1980s and subsequently.

In re-igniting a familiar debate about the balance between state security and individual privacy, the revelations of former NSA contractor Edward Snowden have stalled on matters of regulation and reform, which treat secrecy, securitisation and surveillance largely in procedural terms.

Using historical and recent examples, this essay proposes seven theses on the philosophy of resistance. We have entered a new age of resistance and potentially radical change after fifty years of failures and defeats of the left.

Article

James Penney, Dhanveer Singh Brar, Jade Munslow Ong, Caspar Melville, Joseph Darlington, Elena Tzelepis

Autumn 2014

This issue of New Formations presents a range of exciting new work which spans and connects the fields of cultural studies, literary theory and radical political philosophy.

Article

Ben Highmore, Jenny Bourne Taylor

Summer 2014

In this introduction we suggest a number of ways that mood has been and can be a productive way to approach various forms of labour including: the emotional expenditure of those that care either professionally or as ‘voluntary’ labourers; the pedagogic labour of teaching; and the mood work of the state and the media.

This essay explores the sociality of moods as a sociality that does not simply bring us together. Reflecting specifically on how attunement creates strangers (as those who are only dimly perceived) the essay explores how some have to work to become attuned to others.

Article

Belinda Morrissey, Nicholas Daly, Ben Noys, Ben Highmore

Summer 2014

This essay introduces the special double issue (80/81) of New Formations, Neoliberal Culture. It situates the eleven other contributions to the volume in the context of the wider field of debate over the existence and nature of ‘neoliberalism’ as a specifiable and analysable phenomenon.

Meritocracy, in contemporary parlance, refers to the idea that whatever our social position at birth, society ought to facilitate the means for 'talent' to 'rise to the top'. This article argues that the ideology of ‘meritocracy’ has become a key means through which plutocracy is endorsed by stealth within contemporary neoliberal culture.

This is a dialogue conducted over email by Mark Fisher, author of the widely-read Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative and Jeremy Gilbert, editor of New Formations.

This essay examines contemporary Britain’s foodscape in order to identify how mediatised life-quests uphold ‘boom-based’ culinary/consumptive motifs while mobilising a distinctive ‘austerity aesthetic’ that coincides and colludes with the British state’s neoliberal austerity narrative.

Article

Nicky Marsh, Paul Crosthwaite, Peter Knight, Lisa Downing, Scott McCracken, Jarad Zimbler, Raji Vallury, Benjamin Noys

Autumn / Winter 2013

Show me the Money: The Culture of Neoliberalism - Nicky Marsh, Paul Crosthwaite and Peter Knight | Power for Pleasure - Lisa Downing | Forty Winks - Scott McCracken | Ideational Cinema - Jarad Zimbler | Thought-Perception Beyond Form or, the Logic of Shame - Raji Vallury | Culture or Barbarism? - Benjamin Noys

This essay foregrounds how technocultural assemblages - software platforms, algorithms, digital networks and affects - are constitutive of online racialized identities. Rather than being concerned with what online identities are in terms of ethno-racial representation and signification, we can explore how they are materialized via the technologies of online platforms.

This text is a conversation among practitioners of independent political media, focusing on the diverse materialities of independent publishing associated with the new media environment.

Although this is officially an ‘unthemed’ issue of New Formations - collecting simply the best unsolicited submissions received by the journal over the past two years - the resonances and convergence between its various contributions are remarkable.

‘#MySubjectivation’ explores some of the implications changes in the media landscape, including those associated with the development of corporate social media and social networks such as Twitter and Facebook, have for the ways in which theorists and philosophers create, perform and circulate research and knowledge.

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