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Jeremy Gilbert introduces issue 96-97 of New Formations.

Inspired by Hall et al.’s Policing the Crisis (1978), the authors provide a conjunctural analysis of present-day Germany. It is based on a periodisation of Merkelism – the dominant political mode of managing the economic, political and cultural crisis tendencies in the country from the mid-2000s onwards.

This article draws on Donald Winnicott’s understanding of human dependence and Ken Loach’s film I, Daniel Blake (2015) to open up a new space between ‘psychoanalysis’ and ‘politics’.

This essay is a study of the notion of representation – its relation to difference, politics, diaspora, otherness, truth, and doxa – within Stuart Hall’s work.

Alan Finlayson reviews Stuart Hall, Selected political writings – The Great Moving Right Show and other essays, edited by Sally Davison, David Featherstone and Bill Schwarz, London, Lawrence and Wishart, 2017.

David Glover reviews Stuart Hall, The Fateful Triangle: Race, Ethnicity, Nation, Kobena Mercer (ed), Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Foreword), Cambridge MA and London, Harvard University Press, 2017.

Jeremy Gilbert introduces issue 95 of New Formations.

In the last works of his life, especially The Hermeneutics of the Subject (1981-82) and The Courage of Truth (1983-84), Foucault turned again towards the possibility of seeking other rules of subjectification so as to play the games of power ‘with as little domination as possible’. His encouragement was to remember the philosophical strategy associated with Socrates, namely to attend to oneself through activating the soul’s contemplation of the actions of the self: thereby composing an ethical subject whose actions, through practices of freedom and truth-telling, are not enslaved by appetites; and whose ethos of care becomes extended through the conduct of relationships with others, including life (bios) itself. This paper extends Foucault’s expositions on ‘the care of the self ’ and ‘the courage of truth’ to affirm animist and affective activations of the soul silenced through the consolidated colonial universality of so-called western knowledge.

In this article, I explore the smile as regulatory mechanism installed in the face to organise a subject’s responses to neo-imperial/biopolitical capitalist governmentality.

Article

Michelle Meagher, Heejoo Park, Robert Spencer, Rob Lapsley

Filippo Menozzi introduces a special issue of New Formations which celebrates and reconsiders Rosa Luxemburg.

Rosa Luxemburg’s The Accumulation of Capital, which spurred intense discussion and debate from the moment of its publication in 1913, has taken on new resonance in light of the global expansion of capitalism, the destruction of indigenous cultures and habitats, and capital’s reconfiguration of public and private space. No less important is a series of additional works by Luxemburg that address these themes, but which have received far less attention.

This article recapitulates Rosa Luxemburg’s considerations on the capitalist penetration of non-capitalist economies as a condition for capital accumulation, as well as her arguments about the limits of social reform and the shortcomings of claims for national self-determination.

Jeremy Gilbert introduces this issue of New Formations, which brings together a typically diverse selection of work in contemporary cultural studies and critical theory, as well as a major translation project of direct interest to ongoing debates in the field.

This article seeks to theorise boredom in the wake of the new technological modes of capture and commodification that have emerged in a digital network culture, by focusing on the popular ‘What to do When You’re Bored’ sub-genre of YouTube video tutorials that are addressed largely to female teenage audiences.

Zara Dinnen and Sam McBean contribute to thinking about the emergence of the face in digital culture.

Article

Nicholas Beuret , Peter Buse, Mihail Evans, Joseph Darlington, Ida Djursaa

Summer 2018

Manuela Rossini and Mike Toggweiler introduce New Formations 92: Posthuman Temporalities.

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