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Jeremy Gilbert introduces this issue of New Formations, which brings together a typically diverse selection of work in contemporary cultural studies and critical theory, as well as a major translation project of direct interest to ongoing debates in the field.

This article seeks to theorise boredom in the wake of the new technological modes of capture and commodification that have emerged in a digital network culture, by focusing on the popular ‘What to do When You’re Bored’ sub-genre of YouTube video tutorials that are addressed largely to female teenage audiences.

Zara Dinnen and Sam McBean contribute to thinking about the emergence of the face in digital culture.

Article

Nicholas Beuret , Peter Buse, Mihail Evans, Joseph Darlington, Ida Djursaa

Summer 2018

Bill Schwarrz on the financialisation of the universities.

Phoebe Moore discusses the effects of the increasing use of digital technology within the labour process.

Sylvia Walby makes the case for inclusive economic growth.

David Edgar considers the contemporary legacy of the movements of 1968.

Article

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, James Stafford

Spring 2018

With the left in a strengthened position and the Labour party enjoying something of an internal truce, this issue takes the opportunity to investigate the normative foundations for a twenty-first century social democracy.

The automation revolution demands an active state: one that promotes investment in new technologies while securing good jobs for all workers.

Nick Srnicek in conversation with Lise Butler

What is the story of the economy in Britain? Who gets to shape public opinion about what it’s for, how it’s broken and how it can be fixed? And how can progressive forces tell a new story to help accelerate the shift to a new economic system?

There is a growing recognition that decentralisation and localism should play a key role in a future Labour manifesto. Where should Labour look for lessons about effective localism? The party’s own past provides valuable lessons about how to forge a progressive localism.

Peter Lee offers an example of Labour politics rooted in a local community and founded on finding practical solutions to local problems. To follow his example today, Labour needs to work to localise power, build an industrial strategy based on the needs of the everyday economy and democratise the way our economy works.

Wendy Brown discusses Trump and ‘libertarian authoritarianism’; #Metoo and neoliberal feminism; and political theory and cultural studies. She argues that, in the contemporary moment, we need ‘grit, responsibility and determination instead of hope’.

Scotland’s oil should be left under the seabed.

Grime politics articulates new forms of cross-race working-class identities.

Since 2010, the London Borough of Enfield has been a pioneering local entrepreneurial state. Alan Sitkin outlines ten lessons learned from the Enfield experiment.

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