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In introducing a series of articles that explore positive and programmatic alternatives to neoliberalism, Michael Rustin points to its links with After Neoliberalism: the Kilburn Manifesto, the main focus of which was to analyse and expose the workings of neoliberalism.

Housing is an area where neoliberalism has been successful in shifting attitudes away from the notion that it is the business of the state to make provision for adequate homes for all, and towards the idea that housing should be seen as a market: i.e. the state has no business in subsidising the poor through providing affordable housing, or in regulating the private sector.

Identity politics is often misrepresented as undermining our ability to forge a sense of our collective humanity, leaving us trapped in single-issue debates and unable to develop meaningful connections outside of our group. Roshi Naidoo argues that the opposite is true: it is through, rather than in spite of, identity that we can find solidarity, connection and a more profound sense of humanity that embraces rather than suppresses difference in the name of a greater good.

Hermann Weber, the Mannheim University-based doyen of communist studies, died on 29 December 2014; he was 86 year of age. Weber’s impact on the study of communism was given a special significance by the country’s cold-war division on Europe’s front line between East and West; and his work had the insights of a former communist ‘insider’ who had broken with a system he soon recognised to be a dictatorship over the party and society.

Article

James Stafford, Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite

Spring 2016

Labour, and the left, are in a mess, and there are no easy answers. Recognising this is a precondition for the renewal we need.

In his new book, A Better Politics, Danny Dorling asks what policies emerge when we take happiness as the priority for politics and economics.

This piece aims to demonstrate that now is not the time for the international Left to be disputing the Rojava revolution and whether it fits their theoretical framework, but to instead show communitarian solidarity with the Rojavans in what is arguably a fight for freedom and popular democracy against the forces of fascism.

Informed by anarchism, this article raises the possibility of viewing the state per se as a system of domination, oppression, appropriation and exclusion, one that is interwoven with other systems and influences them as much as they influence the state.

Euromemorandum 2016 critically reviews economic policy in the EU in 2015. It argues that the current slight easing of fiscal pressure should be replaced by co-ordinated fiscal expansion. It also discusses the EU democratic deficit with special reference to Greece, as well as migration, youth unemployment and TTIP.

To understand how sexism works, to ask why sexism remains stubbornly persistent in shaping worlds, determining possibilities, deciding futures, despite decades of feminist activism, is to work out and to work through the very mechanics of power. [...]

This article, based on a lecture of the same title prepared for the Sexism Workshop at Goldsmiths College in 2014, builds on personal experience to address the persistence of sexism in the academy. The individual experiences on which it is based are both personal and generic, and the aim of revisiting them here is diagnostic: to examine sexism as a means of reproduction.

In this article we discuss the sexual harassment that occurs within academic institutions between academic staff and students. Our interest is in analysing the ways that sexism and sexual harassment are enabled and sustained in the university environment.

Article

Zara Dinnen, Geoff Eley, John Ó Maoilearca, Sam McBean

Autumn 2015

Reviews by Zara Dinnen, Geoff Eley, John Ó Maoilearca and Sam McBean

Ada Salter

This book is on sale! Normally £20.00. Browse all of the books in the Christmas sale here. This rich history tells the life story of Ada Salter, who, in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, had pioneering roles in local politics as well as in feminist and ethical socialist movements. Graham Taylor here shifts the focus, usually on Ada's husband Alfred, to Ada's remarkable work, and her significant impact on Bermondsey and on national politics.

Noisiness in political debate can be a virtue and a vice. Jeremy Corbyn’s incredible victory in the Labour leadership contest is testament to this: from one point of view he has shown the sheer mobilising power of a clear, polemical ideological vision, even when articulated in an unassuming, modest style. [...]

The movement for workers’ control in the 1970s was among the most promising of the many roads not taken in the forgotten history of the left.

Anyone serious about fostering freedom, equality and social justice should support co-operatives.

Soundings has been arguing for a long time that Labour should ‘take a leap’, that it should challenge the dominant terms of debate: that, rather than accepting the established political terrain, it should be marking out distinctive territory of its own. [...]

Article

Jo Littler, Mandy Merck, Hilary Wainwright, Nira Yuval-Davis, Deborah Grayson

Winter 2015

A roundtable discussion on socialism and feminism with Mandy Merck, Hilary Wainwright, Nira Yuval-Davis and Deborah Grayson, chaired by Jo Littler.

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