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Roshi Naidoo reviews Alexandra Stein, Terror, Love and Brainwashing: Attachment in cults and totalitarian systems, Routledge 2017

Sylvia Walby explores what economic growth for people would look like.

Kevin Morgan introduces an issue exploring further reflections on the 1917 centenary.

Article exploring the ways in which the Comintern served as a ‘start-up’ for worldwide projects and struggles which have left their imprint on the contemporary world, in particular outside of Europe.

Article

Catherin Epstein, Mike Makin-Waite, Geoff Eley, Geoffrey Swain

Spring 2018

John Green, A Political Family: The Kuczynskis, Fascism, Espionage and the Cold War | Joanna Bullivant, Alan Bush, Modern Music, and the Cold War | Gleb J. Albert, Das Charisma der Weltrevolution: Revolutionärer Internationalismus in der frühen Sovietgesellschaft 1917-1927 | Jane Lazarre, The Communist and the Communist’s Daughter – A Memoir | André Liebich and Svetlana Yakhimovich (eds), From Communism to Anti-Communism: Photographs from the Boris Souvarine Collection

Manuela Rossini and Mike Toggweiler introduce New Formations 92: Posthuman Temporalities.

This paper examines the political-ontoepistemological-ethical implications of temporal dis/junction by reading insights from Quantum Field Theory and Kyoko Hayashi’s account of the destruction wrought by the Nagasaki bombing through one another.

Article

Franziska Aigner, Jonathan Beever, Martin Paul Eve, Griselda Pollock

Autumn 2017

Reviews by Franziska Aigner, Jonathan Beever, Martin Eve and Griselda Pollock.

A background to this issue's cover art by portraitist Robert Henri.

Article

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, James Stafford

Autumn/Winter 2017

Labour transformed the electoral map in June. Though the Conservatives form the largest party in the House of Commons, Labour has turned many safe Tory seats into marginals, loosening Theresa May’s grip on her own parliamentary party. Labour now needs a relatively small swing – just 3.57 per cent – to win a majority of one at the next election.

Since the Brexit referendum, cultural and identity explanations for the polarisation of British society have saturated public debate. A comparison between students’ and Brexit voters’ attitudes to economic insecurity, however, reveals surprising similarities between these supposedly opposing groups. Reforms to higher education and the welfare state could be the key to winning a governing majority for Labour.

It’s commonly assumed that the Brexit referendum exposed pre-existing faultlines in British society. But we need to take seriously the idea that voting produces divisions and identities, rather than simply measuring them. If we consider the sorts of subjects and identities our current modes of voting in elections and referendums produce, we might be prompted to embrace more reflective, and more deliberative, democratic practices, in order to bridge rather than entrench divisions in British society.

Few living figures can match Stuart Holland’s range of experience and insight into both British and continental European politics. As an advisor to Harold Wilson, Willy Brandt, Jacques Delors and António Guterres, Labour MP for Vauxhall 1979-89, and as a leading light behind Labour’s economic programmes in the 1970s and early 1980s, he has profoundly shaped the political economy of the Labour left and the case for a ‘Social Europe’. With the left now ascendant within Labour, the EU locked in permanent crisis, and the UK struggling to come to terms with Brexit, Renewal caught up with Stuart Holland in Coimbra, Portugal.

The international political environment will inevitably affect the UK government’s ability to pursue its trade policy goals after Brexit. Global trade politics is marked by significant institutional fragmentation, creating a difficult environment for a ‘middle power’ like the UK. In order to safeguard progressive policy objectives, the UK should pass a Trade Bill that would bring trade policy under domestic public scrutiny.

The NHS in its current form is good at keeping people alive but not at keeping them well. Labour should be championing a fundamental change to how we fund and provide health and care, with the aim of keeping people well, and supporting people with long term conditions

Basic income may not be the ideal response to automation and technological unemployment envisaged by its proponents. In fact, it risks embalming our current economy – defined by low-skilled, low-paid, and unrewarding work – for longer than would otherwise be the case.

The first instalment of the Soundings Futures analysis of education.

In the international media, the current situation in Catalonia is often explained with reference to the Franco era and the suppression of Catalan language and culture during that time. Commentators also refer to the fact that during the Spanish Civil War the majority of Catalans fought on the side of the Republican government, which meant that after Franco won the war, oppression in Catalonia was especially brutal: large numbers of Catalans were imprisoned, disappeared and killed by the Franco regime.

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