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Anthony Painter considers whether the left's ‘institutional turn’ will extend freedom and empower individuals and communities, or tend towards bureaucracy and paternalism.

Jon Burke and Mika Minio-Paluello discuss climate transition, local government, and the potential for a geographical and ecological rebalancing of Britain’s economy.

Three recent books engage with the challenges of building institutions that can deliver real social security and empower people as workers and citizens.

In political campaigns in the UK, US, Canada and elsewhere we are seeing the importance of big politics – ideas radical enough to tackle the vast challenges we face – and big organising – building social movements and empowering volunteers to drive campaigns at scale.

Renewal meets Professor Mary Kaldor to discuss her support for left campaigns against Brexit, and to ask what remains of projects for a left-liberal globalism in our current age of revived national power-politics.

Joe Guinan and Martin O’Neill discuss Labour's new twenty-first century socialist political economy.

Thomas M. Hanna argues for democratised and decentralised forms of public ownership.

A review of Rachel Reeves, The Everyday Economy, 2018.

Monique Charles and Natalie Thomlinson respond to Charlotte Proudman's critique of the Labour leadership’s engagement with the feminist tradition.

Francis King introduces Socialist History 53

Samuel Foster explores how the Southern Slavs, developed a distinctively social­ist movement and culture of their own, particularly from 1903 to 1914, capable of both challenging and shaping politics in the Balkans.

Jeremy Gilbert introduces this issue of New Formations, which brings together a typically diverse selection of work in contemporary cultural studies and critical theory, as well as a major translation project of direct interest to ongoing debates in the field.

This article seeks to theorise boredom in the wake of the new technological modes of capture and commodification that have emerged in a digital network culture, by focusing on the popular ‘What to do When You’re Bored’ sub-genre of YouTube video tutorials that are addressed largely to female teenage audiences.

Zara Dinnen and Sam McBean contribute to thinking about the emergence of the face in digital culture.

Article

Nicholas Beuret , Peter Buse, Mihail Evans, Joseph Darlington, Ida Djursaa

Summer 2018

Bill Schwarrz on the financialisation of the universities.

Sylvia Walby makes the case for inclusive economic growth.

David Edgar considers the contemporary legacy of the movements of 1968.

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