From Serfdom to Socialism

Author(s): 
Jun 2015
/
ISBN: 
9781910448472
/
176
pp
£13.00

A key text for the first generation of Labour Party activists, From Serfdom to Socialism stands both as a founding document of the Labour Party and as the fullest exposition of Hardie’s political thought.

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Keir Hardie was the founder of the Labour Party, a pioneer trade unionist, a tireless campaigner for women’s rights, and the first working man ever to be elected to Parliament. As a key text for the first generation of Labour Party activists, From Serfdom to Socialism stands both as a founding document of the Labour Party and as the fullest exposition of Hardie’s political thought. It draws together into a coherent and explicitly socialist whole Hardie’s – often disparate – ideas on history, religion, women’s rights, and local and national government. In signalling the arrival of the Labour Party on the national stage, and defining all that it stood for, this book was to change the political landscape of Britain forever.

Introduction – John Callow 
Foreword 
1. Basic Principles 
2. Municipal Socialism 60
3. Socialism and the State 
4. Socialism and Christianity 
5. Socialism and the Worker 
6. Socialism and the Woman Question 
7. From Serfdom to Socialism 
8. Summary and Conclusion 
9. Appendix 
10. Bibliography

‘the first man from the midst of the working class who completely understood them, completely championed them … never deserted them, never turned his back on a single principle which he had professed, never drifted away from his class in thought, in feeling or in faith.’

John Bruce Glasier

‘France had her Jaures, Germany her Bebel and Liebknecht, Austria her Victor Adler, Russia her Lenin. Britain produced, and continues to produce, men to carry on the struggle of the poor, but no one who more personifies the spirit of that struggle than the miner from the coalfields of Lanarkshire.’

James Maxton

‘John Callow’s splendid new edition of James Keir Hardie’s great work From Serfdom to Socialism – the first new edition since 1974 – not only commemorates the centenary of Hardie’s death but also arrives at an important time in the Labour Party’s history.’

‘John Callow’s edition of Hardie’s treatise speaks as urgently to the early twenty-first-century reader as it did to its readers more than a hundred years ago.’

Deborah Mutch, Cercles